MTA Distributors

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Stay away from Honda small engines
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NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE -- I bought a pressure washer with a Honda engine on 6/18/09. Used it twice with no problems. Third time it would not start so took it to the authorized Honda repair shop. They say it needs the gas tank and carburetor cleaned (after two uses????) and warranty won't cover it. Repair cost of $58 on a practically brand new product. I called MTA Distributors and they claimed I had put in bad gas that had broken down after a couple of weeks. HMMM...the gas works o. k. in my car and lawnmower! (Maybe I should buy "magic gas"). Also claim in a related review that may be gas sat in the carburetor "perhaps even months, before the consumer bought it." And that's my fault??? Would do NOTHING to assist so the pressure washer goes to Goodwill or The Dump and I'm out $335 because MTA says it's my problem and Lowes says not to bring it back to them for repairs or a refund. Consumer beware!!!!!
Company Response 09/29/2009:
Response of MTA Distributors to this complaint:

The customer took this Honda-engine powered product to a local servicing dealer. The dealer diagnosed the problem as one not covered by Honda’s warranty, and offered to fix the engine for a reasonable charge. The customer was apparently unhappy with this decision, and so the dealer contacted MTA Distributors. In accordance with Honda’s good-will policy, MTA offered to provide a replacement carburetor at no charge, but the customer would still have to pay the dealer’s labor charge. Apparently this was unsatisfactory to the customer, and she refused the offer and later contacted MTA Distributors directly.

MTA Distributors believes that its personnel handled this customer’s telephoned complaint courteously and professionally, but firmly. When this customer didn’t receive the answer she wanted, she responded rudely and with very inappropriate language, twice. She was given a direct number to contact Honda, which we understand she did. Once again, she was told by Honda that this engine problem was not covered by Honda’s warranty policy.

This customer fails to understand that the problems with this engine are not the result of any defect in the engine. Any repairs needed are not covered by Honda’s warranty policy, and are thus her responsibility. The servicing dealer, which had the engine in hand, diagnosed the problem as being caused by gasoline that had deteriorated, and thus clogged the engine’s carburetor and gas tank. This customer fails to understand that gasoline can indeed go “bad” and cause engine problems of the type that she experienced. For more information on the causes of “bad gas,” please see this article: http://autos.aol.com/article/does-gas-go-bad

At the time of purchasing the pressure washer, the customer would have received a copy of the owner’s manual for the Honda GCV160 engine that powered the washer. Pages 22 through 26 of this manual thoroughly discuss the problems that can occur when gasoline oxidizes and deteriorates. Page 22 of the manual states that “fuel problems may occur within a few months, or even less if the gasoline was not fresh when you filled the fuel tank.” The owner is clearly advised to add a gasoline stabilizer to extend fuel storage life, or to drain the fuel tank and carburetor.

Page 23 of the manual states that “fuel system damage or engine performance problems resulting from neglected storage preparation are not covered under the Distributor’s Limited Warranty.

Neither Honda nor MTA Distributors can be responsible for the quality of the gasoline used by this customer, or the length of time and conditions under which the engine is stored.
     
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