Nivea

1 reviews & complaints.

Sulfa In Lotion
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ALTADENA, CALIFORNIA -- Nivea should prominently display that it contains sulfa because so many persons are allergic to sulfa compounds. took me a while to discover that black blotches on my arms, breast and were caused by this lotion. I used a process of elimination .... when I got to Nivea I finally read ingredients.

In my second non-Nivea week and black-rough blotches are almost cleared up...
     
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User Replies:
Hugh_Jorgen on 04/22/2008:
I'm not sure where the complaint is - since you admit you found sulfa in the list of ingredients, it sounds like they already list it adequately - all you have to do is read the label.

I would imagine someone that knows they have a sulfa allergy would already make a habit of reading the labels on anything they are considering buying.
Principissa on 04/22/2008:
I agree with Hugh. It would be a different story if it weren't listed at all, but they do have it listed. I have a bottle of Nivea lotion in my bathroom and it's listed as one of the ingredients. People with allergies should always check labels before they use anything.
Anonymous on 04/22/2008:
If one with allergies reads every label of every product they buy, or are merely considering to buy...they will be very busy folks indeed. Typically, ingredients are listed in #2 font and sometimes in the same color as the package. Additionally, many ingredients are listed by their chemical names, rather than their common names. I don't see many shoppers with a current copy of the Merck Index under their arms. The poster did the right thing...had an unusual reaction to a product and then did some detective work to find that the product contained a compound she was allergic to. Most of us would do the same thing, exactly the same way. Great post!
voiceoff on 04/22/2008:
Thanks for the info. I am allergic to Sulfa, too. It should be prominently displayed as it is a common substance people are allergic to. I see now that even chocolate will mention it may have touched nuts as they use the same equipment for producing chocolate with or without it and perhaps don't clean in between. I'm not allergic to nuts but many are.
I agree with Doc J that few will read the ingredients ( for eye products the font is .25, I noticed) especially if it is topical rather than ingested.
MSCANTBEWRONG on 04/22/2008:
If one has a food or skin allergy, they likely read the ingredients when buying these type items. In this specific instance, the OP didn't read the ingredients. Good detective work indeed, but could have been avoided by scanning the ingredients to ensure sulfa wasn't one of them.
Anonymous on 04/22/2008:
MSCANTBEWRONG...Would you recognize all of the chemical names of common substances? I have a degree in chemistry and I cannot. The most common causes of allergic skin reactions is laundry detergents. Next, are skin care items. Next are dyes used in clothing. Sometimes we expect our posters to be 'perfect consumers'. They are not. Neither are we. Although to read most of the comments on complaints at m3c, one can assume that many commentators preface their bedtime prayers by asking the Almighty if He has any questions.
MarshPeep on 04/22/2008:
My biggest problem is the teeny tiny print. Even with my glasses on it can be difficult to read the ingredients, especially when the color of the print does not contrast with the background. If it's a common allergic ingredient, I think it should be easy to find and read.
MSCANTBEWRONG on 04/22/2008:
Ghost, no I wouldn't...all I'm saying is that most people with allergies have a tendency to look at the ingredients to see if they recognize any that they have reactions too. I'm allergic to sulfa as well. I just read to see if that particular ingredient is mentioned. If not, I take my chances and purchase it. I've made the same mistake as the OP as I'm human like everyone else. No superiority in knowledge intended. Just an honest opinion.
Anonymous on 04/22/2008:
I understand your comment. But, as an experienced clinician, I disagree with your assumption, MSCANTBEWRONG. While you may be diligent in reading ingredients due to your allergy, a larger people (as witnessed by the number I saw weekly with allergic skin eruptions) do not. The larger issue is that ingredients are listed by names which may be unknown to consumers. Diligent reading of labels in such cases is of no value. All best. We simply disagree.
Anonymous on 04/22/2008:
I understand your comment. But, as an experienced clinician, I disagree with your assumption, MSCANTBEWRONG. While you may be diligent in reading ingredients due to your allergy, a larger people (as witnessed by the number I saw weekly with allergic skin eruptions) do not. The larger issue is that ingredients are listed by names which may be unknown to consumers. Diligent reading of labels in such cases is of no value. All best. We simply disagree.
MSCANTBEWRONG on 04/22/2008:
Touche' Ghost. :)
Anonymous on 04/22/2008:
I apologize for the 'double post'. I made a mistake and hit "Post my Comment" twice.
MSCANTBEWRONG on 04/22/2008:
I thought you were reiterating your point! :) LOL just kidding
Principissa on 04/22/2008:
I have a bottle of Nivea Skin Firming Lotion with Q10 upstairs in the bathroom and it's the second ingredient on the bottle. It also says underneath in bold print "contains Sulfa". I guess I'm weird because I read every label on every product I put in my cart. I like to know exactly what I am putting in and on mine and my kids bodies. Fortunately I have no skin allergies, but there are people who do. And a lot of them don't read the labels, even though they should. You can't force them to read them and even putting the list of ingredients in larger print won't deter someone from not purchasing it because, once again, they don't read them anyway.
MarshPeep on 04/22/2008:
I don't want to be mean, but going to the store with Principissa must be a nightmare! I can't imagine anyone having that much time to be able to read every single label on every item that they buy, every time they buy it. Wow - what I could do with all that time!
jenjenn on 04/22/2008:
LOL MP - not to mention I wouldn't know what the hell I was reading anyway!
DigitalCommando on 04/22/2008:
I think the manufacturers of food products should list at least one crazy ingredient on their label, just for kicks. For example a twinkie could list it's ingredients as: Sugar, more sugar in 48 additional forms, lard, grease and ground up Japanese radio transistor parts. Then list a website and watch that board light up! It would be a great way to get consumers to visit their site and download some coupons for their trouble.
Principissa on 04/22/2008:
Marsh, I'm actually not that bad LOL! My rule of thumb is that if I can't pronounce it and the first 3 ingredients don't sound like food, I ain't buying it. My mother used to do it and I guess it kind of rubbed off on me. By the way, I can do a month's worth of shopping with two kids in under 35 minutes. And that includes the time reading the labels and organizing everything in my cart (frozen foods, refrigerated foods, packaged goods, bottles, beverages, produce, chemicals)
heaven17 on 04/22/2008:
Some of the mindset here is kind of weirding me out. I read every label of everything I am considering using for consumption, small print or not.
It's my personal responsibility to ascertain whether a product is safe for me to use internally or topically.
Saying that the majority of folks these days don't bother reading anything on a label unless it's stated in huge day-glo letters on the front - if this statement is indeed true - is nothing more than a testament to general ignorance.
If I stand to have a serious reaction to something (or even worse), I'm going to read that label up one side and down the other.
We can't expect to be led by the hand on every possible danger by every company.
Anonymous on 04/22/2008:
I'm a reader of ingredients too and have been for at least 30 years. The less ingredients a product has, especially food, the better. And, rule of thumb, if a long word is included that I don't understand, I don't buy it.

As for detergent allergies, both of my kids were sensitive to ingredients in detergents, so I had to be very careful when purchasing. Now they have more allergy-free products. I was once told by a physician that fabric softeners are the worst thing you could use because of all the chemicals--so I haven't used them in years either.
MarshPeep on 04/22/2008:
"I read every label of everything I am considering using for consumption, small print or not."

Heaven - a great number of people cannot read that small print.
Anonymous on 04/22/2008:
Excellent point, Marsh. Sometimes, I don't have my reading glasses with me when I simply dash into the store for one or two things. I suppose I will be bashed for being 'irresponsible' and not foreseeing that I may need my glasses to read labels. Also, one needs to know the chemical names for many ingredients. There are some nasty chemicals with inoxious sounding names and there are some harmless ones that sound like they should be radioactive. Reading is not the same as understanding. This is why few people read labels...not because they are ignorant...but because they cannot decipher what the heck 'monochloroaldedisaccharineoleoresin'is!
Anonymous on 04/22/2008:
lol, Ghost. If it says something like that--I don't buy it. I don't even want to know what it is. If I start to read a label and it has more than a few ingredients, then I'm done. Heavily processed foods are not in my pantry.
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