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Sundance Vacations


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Sundance Vacations Sweepstakes Free Cruise
Posted by Researcher on 01/03/2010
WILKES-BARRE, PENNSYLVANIA -- THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU HAS REVOKED SUNDANCE VACATIONS' BUSINESS ACCREDITATION!

http://tinyurl.com/ye9e5jn

(Copy & paste the above link into the browser)

The following are the very restrictive terms and conditions required to use the Sundance Vacations "promotional cruise." In addition, that "promotional" cruise could ultimately cost you hundreds of dollars. More or equal to the costs that you would incur by booking the cruise on your own without all the detailed restrictions!

"This company is a FRAUD. I also got suckered into going down to pick up the free cruise I had been given as a 'gift.' Now, the customer service agent was correct in that they never use the word 'won'. It’s just a matter of wording to keep their scams on the border-line of legal. And I understood that I had to sit through an hour of a sales pitch. which I was fine with. What I was not fine with were the LIES that they had told me in advance about this free cruise.

LIE #1: I could go on the cruise at ANYTIME during the year. I was told repeatedly by the woman on the phone about how I could basically go whenever dates I wanted to, anytime during the next year. Well, that is a lie. When I received my vacation voucher, I looked at the fine print on the back page. You CANNOT use this cruise during the months of June, July, August, or any week of which there is a holiday.

LIE #2: If I didn't use the cruise, I could do with it whatever I wished. I could give it as a gift or sell it. The fact is, you CANNOT. It clearly states that the name of the trip is non-transferable and cannot be sold.

LIE #3: I was told airfare was included and that I could fly from my local airport. which is a major international airport. That isn't true. They tell you where to fly out of. For example, they mentioned Newark, New Jersey as a possibility. Plus, the fine print says it only includes 'base' airfare. I'm not even sure what the fine print is on base airfare.

LIE #4: I was told I would simply have to pay minor taxes on a trip which values at about 1, 200 dollars. Well, the taxes start at $225 dollars per person (35 percent tax???????) Plus, there are all kind of registration and booking fees on top of that.

LIE #5: I was specifically told on the phone I would even receive free gift cards to Applebee’s, Red Lobster, and Olive Garden if I came to the 5pm presentation. When I inquired about them, the girl gave me a funny look and told me that 'they didn't give them out anymore because people don't use them.' What??? I was told only the DAY BEFORE I would be getting them. So, they gave me this piece of paper and said to go eat somewhere (anywhere), attach the receipt to the paper, send a self addressed stamped envelope, and I could get up to 15 dollars for my meal. I'm not holding my breath. Bottom line, this company is a fraud. They told me out and out lies about the cruise just to get me in. They are very shrewd. They have people designed to search these very blogs just to tell you how wonderful they are. There is an old saying. 'Me thinks thou protests too much.' If someone has to over and over again tell you about all the awards they won and how great they are...makes you wonder why...doesn't it?????"

The following links will offer substantial information about Sundance Vacations and their sweepstakes giveaways used to induce the consumer to attend a $15,000 high pressure sales pitch for a vacation club membership. Copy & paste each URL into the Google search engine.

http://sundancevacationssweepstakes.blogspot.com/

http://sundancevacationsmanipulation.blogspot.com/

http://www.ripoffreport.com/travel-services/sundance-vacations-t/sundance-vacations-tan-spir-j3ccj.htm
___________________________________________________________________
The following was posted by Gina, of Baltimore, MD. an ex-employee of Sundance Vacations. Here is the link to that post >>>

http://www.ripoffreport.com/travel-services/sundance-vacations-t/sundance-vacations-travel-adv-47de8.htm

What Gina says:

"I am an ex- employee of TAN, or Travel Advantage Network. Everything negative that you are saying is true. They are a rip off and a scam. The salesmen make it look nice while they are giving you their sales pitch, but they don't tell you the whole truth. The resorts that they show you at the presentation are VIP resorts, or they could be VIP units. They don't show you what you will be getting if you sign up as a regular TAN client. The regular units, most of them suck and are out of date and dirty. I have walked through many of these units, and most of them are not clean and roach infested. The fees that they charge is also a lie. They tell you at the sales presentation that you can travel to anywhere you want for 99.00 dollars. Yeah, if you want to go the beach in the middle of January in 20 degree weather. This is considered non-peak season. For peak season you have to pay 30.00 extra per night, and also if you want to upgrade to a 2 or a 3 bedroom unit, you also pay 30.00 per night extra, per bedroom. If anyone is thinking about joining TAN, or Sundance Vacations, you need to think twice about it. I worked in customer service at TAN and I was a vacation reservationist and I had to deal with alot of angry people that felt they got ripped off, and they did. Don't think that you can't get your money back, because you can. I have seen it a million times. Don't give in. They will try to reduce your package so that your monthly payments are cheaper, don't do it because you will wind up paying the same, or more money for the package, because they add on more finance charges, and they stretch your loan time out to be longer. DONT DO IT PEOPLE, DONT JOIN TRAVEL ADVANTAGE NETWORK OR SUNDANCE VACATIONS, BECAUSE IT IS A SCAM, I WORKED THERE FOR 2 YEARS AND GOT FIRED BECAUSE I TOOK A CLIENT'S SIDE!!"

     
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Posted by Anonymous on 2010-01-03:
You're right. All of those are lies to get you to buy a vacation package or a timeshare from them. By the way, I redeem cruise certificates all the time and the taxes you mentioned are usually higher. You are required to pay for the port fees and taxes, AND something called the NCF (non commissional fare). This last one is not a tax, its the amount of money that the booking agent doesn't get commission on.
Posted by Hugh_Jorgen on 2010-01-03:
Also, a fair number of these "Free Bahamas Cruises" are basically a day trip on a glorified ferry that takes you from a Florida city to one of the islands where you spend a couple of nights in a fleabag motel.
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Sundance Vacations Packages - Beware
Posted by Chantellequirion47 on 11/21/2011
ILLINOIS -- In October 2009, I fell hook line and sinker for what was presented to me as a fabulous deal. Unfortunately, much to my dismay, here I am 2 years later and trying to cancel my contract and finding that this contract was misrepresented and had so many omissions to begin with some may consider it not even a valid contract. I remember clearly asking the salesman several things, first I asked if this was a Time Share, I was told No. I also asked if this was a BBB acredited business, I was told yes. After much research I have found that not of those things are true. Not to mention that this whole started from a telemarketing call about a cruise I won. My phone number has been on the DO NOT CALL registry since 2007. The relentless messages left by the "Sprint Incentives' caused me to call just to get these people to stop calling. I made an appointment to meet at their Downers Grove Location and cancelled my first appointment with several calls to reschedule. At the second appointment, it turned out to be a high pressured sales pitch where so many things are thrown at you that you really are spinning a bit and quite unclear of what they just told you. None the less I signed, only after trying to contact them to cancel did I research this place. Unfrotunately this was 2 years later and due to financial difficulties. I have been counter offered to lower my packages and payments but have not been able to reach an amicable agreement with these people. I was last told today in an email that if I cancel, I will not receive a refund? I have paid to date $2194 to Tri State Financial (which is owned by the same people) and $450.53 to Travel Advantage. I am supposedc to just walk away form over $2500 and let them keep my money when I have never used their services? I am a little irked how they think this may be fair or that it should be acceptable. By all means if I used your service to begin with, maybe there would be some sort of money I would owe them. I did attempt a few different times to try to book some weeks. You are told up front that there is a $99 booking fee and if you choose to go in "peak season" this would be $30 a day additional. What they fail to mention is that most of the time you are in "peak season" and the majority of the time the place you want to go is unavailable for the time you want. I have seen so many others with the same situation with this company or companies, since they are all the same. I wonder how it is that they get away with this. I have worked customer serveice for almost 20 years, I know for a fact that contracts can be cancelled and full refunds can be given. I am wondering why they think I would be foolish to just give up that money? As a single parent and a soon to be student I surely do not have the means to throw money away like that. Since I can't seem to get anywhere with this, I think the next step it to contact a consumer rights attorney. I have also been in contact with someone in the same near area as me and they have offered her the same cancellation agreement, I am sure we can get together when I speak to this attorney. Unfortunately she was taken for a lot more than me. It's really sad when a company takes advantage of the unkowing and feels they can just take money from people. My advise when you hear about these companies "Sundance Vacations, TAN Travel Advantage Network, Tri State Financial and Sprint Incentives" run as fast as you can... the contract is not at all what it seems
     
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Posted by Alain on 2011-11-23:
Thank you for the warning and you're smart to let an attorney handle this.
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Sundance Vacations Sweepstakes Ruse
Posted by on 01/07/2010
PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY -- Sundance Vacations lies by implication. They are very sophisticated in their designed deception. For example; if you are foolish enough to enter one of the many Sundance Vacations Sweepstakes you will receive relentless telemarketing calls informing you of good/exciting news! Naturally, the consumer who entered the sweepstakes/drawing to win the grand prize will assume that the good news is that they won the sweepstakes, but the sweepstakes is held once a year usually in February. This deception is used to motivate the consumer to return the Sundance Vacations telemarketing call in the event the consumer is not home when the telemarketer calls. Moreover, Sundance Vacations alleges that by entering the sweepstakes/drawing that the consumer has somehow waived their privacy rights guaranteed by the Do Not Call (DNC) legislation, but that is simply not the truth. See: http://naskiewicz.blogspot.com/

(Copy and paste the above URL into the Google search engine)

If and when the Sundance Vacations telemarketer gets you on the phone they will very excitedly tell you that you have been “selected/chosen to receive” a “promotional" cruise or some other impractical to use vacation. Everyone who enters the Sundance Vacations Sweepstakes is "selected" to receive some type of gift vacation. The gimmick is that in order to receive the gift you must first attend a Sundance Vacations high pressure sales pitch at one of their seven sales centers. At that time you will be high pressured to purchase a $15,000 30-week vacation plan similar to Timeshare, but far inferior to an actual Timeshare ownership. If you decline Sundance Vacations will continue to drop the price in order to induce you to sign an non-cancelable contract THAT NIGHT! Moreover, the Sundance Vacations membership has so many restrictions and hidden costs that it is extremely difficult to use as a practical matter. See: http://naskiewicz2.blogspot.com/

(Copy and paste the above URL into the Google search engine)

To make a long story short, before you venture to a Sundance Vacations sales pitch, in addition to the above two URL’s, it would behoove you to Google “Sundance Vacations Sweepstakes Complaints” and draw your own conclusions. My conclusion is very simple; either everyone is lying about Sundance Vacations or, where there’s smoke there’s fire!

If you are the recipient of uninvited and unwanted telemarketing calls, by any organization, you should contact the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) at their website: www.ftc.gov/donotcall and file an online complaint. Or, just call their toll-free hotline number at: 1-888-382-1222.

Always remember; if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is!



     
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Posted by Anonymous on 2010-01-07:
So? You can say no. When my husband and I went to Vegas we went on 3 time share tours. We knew we were not going to buy anything, but we enjoyed their dinners and shows and the $100 they paid us.
Posted by DaveyC on 2010-01-08:
Yep, these folks are pretty high pressure, but stick to your guns and simply say "no thanks". My family spent four days in Branson, MO complete with a bunch of free show tickets, free restaurant vouchers, gas cards, etc. in exchange for 1.5 hours (which stretched to three hours) of intense badgering for us to purchase a timeshare. We didn't bite, but enjoyed our mini-vacation! :)
Posted by Former Sundance Employee on 2010-01-27:
Sundance Vacations is repeatedly telling the consumer that the “sweepstakes” is not a scam because one (1) grand prize is awarded yearly. That may be accurate. However, the issue is not whether a grand prize is awarded, but rather the purpose of the sweepstakes, which is an end run around the Do Not Call restrictions. In addition, the odds of winning are approximately a million to one (1:1,000,000) and what you sacrifice for those astronomical odds is your privacy! Once you enter that sweepstakes with your phone number you will be hounded by Sundance Vacations’ relentless telemarketing calls attempting to induce you to attend a high pressure sales pitch to purchase a very restricted and impractical to use $15,000 vacation membership. Sundance Vacations says that the sweepstakes entry form waives any privacy rights that the consumer is guaranteed under the Do Not Call regulations, but that is simply not the truth. See: http://naskiewicz.blogspot.com/

Those Sundance Vacations telemarketers are unrelenting and if you decline their offer they become indignant and start interrogating you as to “why” you are not interested. (Their commission is based on persuading you to attend the high pressure sales pitch!) What right do they have to invade your privacy and then question your decision to decline their offer? Consequently, if you entered the Sundance Vacations sweepstakes with the hopes of winning the grand prize but NOT with the express intent of inviting relentless telemarketing calls bordering on harassment, and you are registered on the federal or state Do Not Call lists, you should call the FTC at its toll-free hotline at: 1-888-382-1222 because that’s the only way to stop the unwanted and uninvited telemarketing calls!

Posted by PepperElf on 2010-01-27:
well technically you DO waive your "do not call" rights because you entered into a contract with the company.
Posted by Anonymous on 2010-01-27:
Big deal. So they call you every now and then. Just don't answer. Or just hang up on them. I had a telemarketer try their techiques on me by coming up a response to why I didn't want their product. I just simply hung up on him. I actually have to deal with this at the mall. there's this one mall pagoda that is ALWAYS trying to pull people in who are walking past their pagoda to try this stupid skin cleaning stuff......Its ANNOYING. every time I go by there, theres some man or woman like HEY HEY HEY COME HERE TRY THIS and trying to throw their cream in my face. So now, every time Im about to go by there, I pull out my phone and act like Im talking to someone and totally look the other way while theyre screaming in my face with their overpriced shea butter.
Posted by goduke on 2010-01-27:
Is that the "dead sea mineral" scrub place? They are incredibly annoying. I had one lady actually grab my arm to try and pull me over. I explained to her that wasn't a very cool way to do business.
Posted by Anonymous on 2010-01-27:
Yeah it may be that stuff....I was pulled in one time...I liked the stuff but wasnt going to pay 30 dollars for it....she asked me how much I would pay for it, I said 5 bucks. She got mad at me and I left.....
Posted by Former Sundance Employee on 2010-01-27:
PepperElf: If you're suggesting that a sweepstakes entry form constitutes "a contract with the company" you are gravely mistaken. Go to: http://naskiewicz.blogspot.com/ for clarification. Thank you for your comment, albeit inaccurate!
Posted by PepperElf on 2010-01-27:
Actually you DO enter a contract. You are a former employee, but you don't know about the Terms of Service?

http://www.sundancevacations.com/terms.html

It took me all of 10 seconds to find it.


SALES PRESENTATION/GIVEAWAYS/BONUS ENTRY: By entering this Contest you authorize Sponsor and its affiliates and co-sponsor dealership posted on display vehicle to contact you by phone (calls may be monitored and recorded), automated phone equipment and/or pre-recorded messages, mail, and e-mail about this Contest and travel and automobile related goods and services.

So yes, there's a contract/agreement.
Nice? No. Legal? Yes.
Posted by Anonymous on 2010-01-27:
Do people really fill out these sweepstakes forms anymore?
Posted by Anonymous on 2010-01-27:
Well, I normally don't. But every now and then you come across a sweepstates to enter for a free car, and I will enter. No biggie. If I get a telmarket call, I just dont aswer. Done.....No need to get all bent out of shape about it and make a big deal over nothing. People are just trying to make a living like everyone else.
Posted by Former Sundance Employee on 2010-01-27:
PepperElf: It is virtually impossible to have a valid "contract" with any person and/or any entity unless both parties sign the "contract"! What you're referring to as the "Terms of Service" (TOS) in the fine print on the reverse of the sweepstakes entry form.

http://naskiewicz.blogspot.com/

"SALES PRESENTATION/GIVEAWAYS/BONUS ENTRY: By entering this Contest you authorize Sponsor and its affiliates and co-sponsor dealership posted on display vehicle to contact you by phone (calls may be monitored and recorded), automated phone equipment and/or pre-recorded messages, mail, and e-mail about this Contest and travel and automobile related goods and services."

That's not a "contract" that's a statement of the TOS, period! To equate a sweepstakes entry form with a "contract" is patently absurd and has no legal binding as would a "contract."

I candidly admit to being a former disgruntled employee; I wonder if you'll candidly admit that you're probably a current employee attempting to defend your employer!
Posted by PepperElf on 2010-01-27:
no matter what you call it be it a contract or agreement it is legal

and no i'm not going to read some dude's blog about it.
Posted by Anonymous on 2010-01-27:
I didn't come on this site, to go to another site and read some stupid blog. If something is that important, include it in a post.
Posted by Anonymous on 2010-01-27:
Former Sundance Employee, Awesome link. Thanks for posting it. Very educational. So, if I read the info right the FTC and the Pennsylvania Attorney General both hold the opinion that the silly disclaimer doesn't supersede the law. Interesting.
Posted by Researcher on 2010-01-27:
Posted by Researcher on 2010-01-27:
PepperElf: It's only a matter of time before that issue (whether or not a sweepstakes entry form is tantamount to an authorization or request for an invasive telemarketing call) goes to court. Another week, another month, another year, but it will eventually be subject to judicial review and then we'll see how "legal" it is! Quite naturally, marketing interests will mount the same vigorous challenges as they did to the Do Not Call legislation, which went all the way to the US Supreme Court, and they will meet the same defeat; it's only a matter of time!
Posted by PepperElf on 2010-01-27:
but it still has to go to court first.


there is however a workable solution to this, one that's very easy to do.

read the statements *fully* before agreeing to them
and if you don't like the conditions, don't complete the agreement.


and it's somewhat sad really that the typical reaction to agreements like that seems to be "oh i'll agree to it and then fight it in court when it doesn't go my way"

it's like what i've said before...
If a company doesn't live up to its side of an agreement it's a MAJOR issue. But if the customer doesn't want to live up to his/her side o an agreement, suddenly the agreement is "unfair"
Posted by JohnF on 2011-08-08:
In case after case of sales organizations that use the sweepstakes ruse as a means of skirting the Do-Not-Call regulations the FTC has taken remedial action and have repeatedly ruled that sweepstakes entry forms, not-with-standing the alleged fine print disclosures, do not waive the consumers’ privacy rights under the DNC legislation. Yet Sundance Vacations aka SunScam Vacations, continues to defy the DNC regulations! What does that say about the ethics and integrity of the company? What it says is that Sundance Vacations doesn’t care about what may be illegal or unethical
Posted by Researcher on 2011-08-11:
The cases referred to by "John" can be found at the following:

http://sundancevacationsdefiesftc.blogspot.com/

Despite all the wishful thinking, the FACT remains that a sweepstakes entry form does not constitute permission to call any phone numbers registered on the DNC lists!
Posted by Researcher on 2011-08-11:
The cases referred to by "John" can be read at the following:

http://sundancevacationsdefiesftc.blogspot.com/

Despite all the wishful thinking, the FACT remains that a sweepstakes entry form does not constitute permission to call those numbers on the DNC listings.
Posted by Take Resposibility on 2012-05-29:
For crying out loud. Do you think these companies give out stuff out of the goodness in their hearts? It is marketing and if you don't wish to be contacted DON'T SIGN UP FOR THEIR SWEEPSTAKES!! My wife signs up for everything she sees and sometimes has won some nice prizes I simply answer the calls and tell them I'm not interested or I am if they call back I ask to speak to a supervisor and that is the end of that.. Have a freakin backbone or don't sign up, take responsibility for your own actions!!
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Sundance Vacations Telemarketing Review
Posted by Former Sundance Employee on 01/27/2010
Sundance Vacations is repeatedly telling the consumer that the “sweepstakes” is not a scam because one (1) grand prize is awarded yearly. That may be accurate. However, the issue is not whether a grand prize is awarded, but rather the purpose of the sweepstakes, which is an end run around the Do Not Call restrictions. In addition, the odds of winning are approximately a million to one (1:1,000,000) and what you sacrifice for those astronomical odds is your privacy! Once you enter that sweepstakes with your phone number you will be hounded by Sundance Vacations’ relentless telemarketing calls attempting to induce you to attend a high pressure sales pitch to purchase a very restricted and impractical to use $15,000 vacation membership. Sundance Vacations says that the sweepstakes entry form waives any privacy rights that the consumer is guaranteed under the Do Not Call regulations, but that is simply not the truth. The following blog clearly explains the DNC issue:

http://naskiewicz.blogspot.com/

Those Sundance Vacations telemarketers are unrelenting and if you decline their offer they become indignant and start interrogating you as to “why” you are not interested. (Their commission is based on persuading you to attend the high pressure sales pitch!) What right do they have to invade your privacy and then question your decision to decline their offer? Consequently, if you entered the Sundance Vacations sweepstakes and you are registered on the federal or state Do Not Call lists, you should call the FTC at its toll-free hotline at: 1-888-382-1222 because that’s the only way to stop the unwanted and uninvited telemarketing calls!


     
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Posted by goduke on 2010-01-27:
It's the same types of folks who have drawings available at the state fair and/or other types of events. You enter for a chance, and then you get telemarketing calls. Better to not even enter the sweepstakes.
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